MagnifyingTruthLast week we introduced the radical concept of telling the T.R.U.T.H. You tell the truth, you say? But, do you deliver the T.R.U.T.H.? How do you tell the truth with clarity and confidence in every pressure cooker situation? You follow the steps of T.R.U.T.H.

T – Tell the Truth
R – Rehearse and practice
U – Understand facts and feelings
T – Three times
H – Humility helps

Last week we covered the T. and the R. This week we will cover U-T-H of the T.R.U.T.H. model.

  • Understand Fact and Feelings - Keep in mind when you are speaking or making a presentation, people want to know how "it" ("it" meaning the "Important Thing," about which you are talking) impacts them. Learn not only the facts of the issues but also how the issues may affect people. Change scares people and some people will avoid change until the pain of not changing is worse than the pain of changing. If you understand the impact of a change and can truthfully convey that to people in such a way that they, too, can understand it – then you will have communicated effectively, with clarity and with confidence. To accomplish this requires research, talking to others, doing whatever is necessary to understand the issue. When you truly understand facts and feelings, you will speak with empathy as well as authority. According to Webster's online, empathy is: "The feeling that you understand and share another person's experiences and emotions: the ability to share someone else's feelings." If empathy doesn't come naturally to you, how do you acquire it? In a New York Times book review of "The Empathy Exams" by Leslie Jamison, the author is quoted as saying, "Empathy isn't just something that happens to us – a meteor shower of synapses firing across the brain – it's also a choice we make: to pay attention, to extend ourselves. Sometimes we care for another because we know we should or because it's asked for, but this doesn't make our caring "hollow." Also know – and explain – "why" you have a particular point of view or stance on an issue. Be ready to tell "why" you hold to a particular stance when you are making a presentation. Finally, be careful to avoid slang or technical jargon. Using those types of language does not convey empathy for the audience. Not everyone will understand those types of words. If you use "laymen's terms," then your message will be heard and understood. Most people are not as impressed by big words as much as they are with a person who gives evidence of true understanding and empathy.
  • Three times - Simply put - state your core message and then repeat it at least two times. Repeating a theme can help people remember it. This is a strategic move to get your message in the other person's mind from the start. Repeating your core message at least two times makes it very memorable. It is like hearing a popular song over and over again. After awhile the lyrics are stuck in your head. Presenting your core message to an audience multiple times will very likely cause them to consider it. You want your message to stay in people's minds because this is the prelude to them acting on it. The more we hear something, the easier it is to remember. Summarizing your message in the end will also allow listeners to grasp and recall what you're saying. Often if some of your audience didn't closely follow everything you said, they very likely will catch your message in your closing remarks.
  • Humility is our final method. Humility is a sharpening and strengthening attitude. C.S. Lewis of the University of Oxford once said, "Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less." With this in mind, always treat others courteously and respectfully. A respectful person receives respect in return. Never mock, ridicule or become combative when speaking or answering a question. Avoid sarcasm because it will fail most times. You risk people hearing your sarcasm not even understanding your point.

Tying it all together

To be an effective communicator you must be prepared before you speak. When you are prepared, you can speak boldly, prudently and without hesitancy. Practice what you will say and how you will say it. As a part of your practice and preparation get in front of the mirror and go over your presentation. Record your voice as you practice to determine your inflection, tone and pacing. Once you memorize the meaning of the letters in this acronym, you'll more easily recall the steps of action that can help you communicate with clarity and confidence.
T – Tell the truth
R – Rehearse and practice
U – Understand facts and feelings
T – Three times
H – Humility helps

Speak with the right tone of voice and with the right intonation, internalizing your core message. State your message early and then repeat it at least two times. It will register with people and stay with them. Take your work and other people seriously, yourself...not so much. The more you succeed in your communication opportunities, the more proficient of a communicator you will become. If you are interested in learning more about communicating the T.R.U.T.H. with clarity and confidence in any situation, contact Orgwide Services at 901-850-8190.

Leave us a message and a best time to contact you.

* Fields are required